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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)
a man walked on the moon. apollo 17 astronauts were there on december 14th, 1972. a number of the explorers who made the trip passed away. the rest are now in their late 70s some 80s. but the story they tell sounds like something out of the future not the past. it's a story of how america with a combination of vision, high-tech know how and good old fashioned courage answered the challenge of a rival stepped into the unknown and achieved what almost seems as unbelievable today as it was a half century ago. >> it was october 4th, 1957, and at the height of the cold war. the soviets launched a satellite named sputnik which orbited the earth in over an hour and a half. >> they tell us the world may never be the same again. >> in 1957 when i was still in flight school sputnik was launched the beginning of the space age. >> the dawn of the space age was the start of the space race. america competing with the soviets for scientific dominance. but in a world where americans dug bomb shelters and worried about muss ills science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been pr
on the moon. apollo 17 astronauts were there on december 14th, 72. a number of the exprers who made the trip passed away. the rest are now in their late 70s some 80s. but the story they tell sounds like something out of the future not the past. it's a story of how america with a combination of vision, high-tech know how and good old fashioned courage answered the challenge of a rival stepped into the unknown and achieved what almost seems as unbelievable today as it was a half century ago. >> it was october 4th, 1957, and at the height of the cold war. the soviets launched a satellite named sputnik which orbited the earth in over an hour and a half. >> they tell us the world may never be the same again. >> in 1957 when i was still in flight school sputnik was launched the beginning of the space age. >> the dawn of the space age was the start of the space rae. america competg with the soviets for scientific dominance. but in a world where americans dug bomb shelters and worried about muss ills science spelled national security. >> the cold war had been pro clonged it was going on nobody could
on the moon, apollo 17 astronaut on december 14, 1972, a number of the explorers who made the trip passed away and the rest are in their late 70's and some 80 but the story sounds like something from the future, not the past. it is a story about how america was a combination of vision, high-tech know how and good old fashioned courage answered the challenge of a rival, stepped into the unknown and achieved what almost seems as unbelievable today as it was a half century ago. it was october 4, 1957, at the height of the cold war the soviets launched a beachball size satellite that orbited the earth for an hour. >> the world may never be the same. >> in 1957 condition i was in flight school, sputnik was the dawn of the space age which was the start of the space race. america competing with the soviets for scientific dominance but in a world where america worried about missiles, science spelled "national security." >> the cold war was prolonged, it was going on and no one could see an end to it, and there were underlying risks of nuclear confrontation. >> the next step in the race was manned laun
have ignition, four, three, two, one, zero. we have lit off. it is lighting up the sky. >>neil: apollo 17 was on the way to the noon 40 years ago carried the men who would be the last human beings to walk on the moon, 40 years after we conquered the stars, why open earth can we just grow on a damn budget? i cannot plain washington, dc. i can explain, now, the folks would make them look very small, the heroes, actually, who brought us to the moon and did the impossible, remember now, 40 years after that last mission to the moon surface that anything is possible. i don't want to give away our sunday night "fly me to the moon" special but i want to give you a teaser, what made them so special. >> we are not thinking about what goes wrong, worry is a wasted emotion. it clouds clear thinking that is absolutely needed when something is wrong. >> i didn't have guts i knew what i was doing. i didn't go to the moon not to come back. >>neil: did you think you might die? >> we thought our chances were about 10 percent. >>neil: did you hear that? 10 percent. one out of ten chance of coming out tha
. like the crew of apollo 8, who took this picture commonly known as "earth rise" from the window of the craft as they orbited the moon in 1968. unfortunately, nearly half the earth was in shadow. an unmanned soviet spacecraft called zond 7 got this shot during a lunar fly-by. i guess you would call that a gibbous earth. fully lit by the sun. it is probably a shot you have seen so often you don't think how amazing it is. it was nicknamed the blue marble and it was taken by one of the astronauts on board, apollo 17. apollo 17 launched 40 years ago today, december 17, 1972. it was a night launch, aiming for the littoral valley. gene cernan, harrison jack schmitt and ron evans aboard. apollo 17 launched at night, and when they landed three days later, the sun was behind them. and so that particular launch trajectory put a fully formed beautifully lit earth in the window of the command module at a time when the astronauts really should have been too busy to look at it. here is how al reinert, who co-wrote the movie "apollo 13" describes what happened. quote, at five hours and a few mi
years since the last manned mission to the moon. coming up, rusty schicart from apollo 9. we will discuss what it was like to go up there. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. so i never missed a beat. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. why let constipation stry miralax.? mirlax worksdifferently than other laxatives. it dws water into your colon to unblock your system naturally. don't wait to fe great. miralax. is bigger than we think ... sometimelike the flu.fer from with aches, fever and chills- the flu's a really big deal. so why treat it like it's a little cold? there's something that works differently than over-the-counter remedies. prescription tamiflu attacks the flu virus at its source. so don't wait. call your doctor right away. tamiflu is prescription medicine for treating the flu in adults and children one year and older whose flu symptoms started within the last two days. before taking tamiflu tell your doctor if you're pregnant, nursing. have
since the last mission lifted off for the moon. apollo 15's moon walker sits down with me next. ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] everyone deserves the gift of all day pain relief. this season, discover aleve. all day pain relief with just two pills. alisyn: several people reportedly hurt on japan's coast after a powerful 7.3 quake hits the same region defend stated by last year's quake and tsunami. today's quake triggered small waves. but there are no reports of heavy damage there. a tsunami warning issues earlier has since been canceled. their is new reaction from the royal family to that apparent suicide of a nurse who was duped by two deejays looking to prank call the duchess of cambridge. a sydney-based radio station called the hospital where the differences was being treated for acute morning sickness. they preterngded to queen elizabeth and they tricked the nurse to transferring them to the private nurse who cave out sensitive information. >> what was being treated even by prince charles yesterday as a bit of a joke has turned today into a deep tragedy. 10 hours or so ago p
apollo 17 went to the moon. our correspondent has all of the details. >> december, 1972. nasa sense and astronauts to the moon for the last time. no one has been back since. >> one giant leap for private enterprise. >> some former employees have launched a new company. it says it will soon be offering commercial flight back to the surface. >> our vision is to create a reliable and affordable u.s.- based, commercial lunar transportation system. >> this is the module they used 40 years ago and this is what they hope will take people there by 2020. the company says it will cost $1.4 billion. it will be open to corporations and wealthy individuals. countries like japan, south korea and south africa would be able to carry out research on the lunar surface. 40 years ago, only the resources of the u.s. could send an astronaut to them in. now there is no political will or the money to do it again. according one of the last man to be there, it will be the private sector from now one that will leave the way back. >> it will be an effort by private investors, obviously regulated and sanctioned
.: for all mankind. god speed the crew of apollo 17. >> i'm convinced that the space program will come back. >> the country needs to have something to look up to, to be proud of 6789 what can we do 10,000 years, look how far in 70 years. my grandfather on a farm in michigan had a ringing phone, no electricity, and an out house and watched a man on the moon in her lifetime. i'd like to see-- i hope that happens. >> . >> jamie: a very important special, if you have memories, personal memories, even if you don't. joining us now on the phone retired u.s. air force colonel, current nasa astronauts dr. coleman spent more than 4,000 hours in space aboard the space shuttle columbia on board the international space station, she's done it all. dr. coleman, katie, great to have you here. >> it's nice to be there. >> jamie: what is that anniversary, that date, today, mean to you? >> well, the fact that it's 40 years since apollo 17, in some ways, it seems like such a big number and yet, i think that what we've done in the meantime is just simply amazing and to think back this is the last time that
to try not to. think of being jim lovell from apollo 13 afford to was special the 40th anniversary of the last lunar landing and the one flight that did not make it. but outshone many people for how they handled the crisis. >> the crew of apollo 13. >> 56 hours into the flight the finished broadcast showing how comfortably they lived and worked. >> we will get back to a pleasant evening. >> nine minutes later oxygen tank number two blew up causing the number one tank to fail. >> houston we have a problem. forever linked to commander jim lovell. >> when the explosion occurred why not apollo 12414? i could not believe what was happening. then i said it is me. it is now. what i n
like insurmountable odds to safely bring our heroes back home. >> and apollo, 13, everyone is there. . >> 56 hours into the flight, the crew finished a broadcast, how comfortably they lived and worked in weightlessness. >> and closing out the section of aquarius and get back to a pleasant evening. >> fine minutes later, oxygen tank number two blew up causing the number one tank to also bail. >> houston, we had a problem. words at that would be forever linked to commander jim lovely. >> when the explosion occurred, i thought to myself why me? why now? ab go on apollo 12 or wait until apollo 14 and for a little while, i couldn't believe what was happening and then awed of a sul. all of a sudden, it is me and it's now, what's next. >> harris: riveting, don't miss it. "fly me to the moon" right after huckabee. the nation marking 71 years since the japanese attacked pearl harbor, thousands of americans on that december day. and who could forget these pictures, and a mon who survived was not just on one battleship that lot hit, he was on two-. his story when we come back. >> on friday we
, and we are standing literally in the shadow of the great temple of apollo. >> narrator: apollo, the sun god, watched over the fortunes of corinth. like zeus, hera, artemis and athena, apollo was one of the olympian gods, that family of divinities who presided over the ancient and diverse pagan universe. >> paganism is our designation for what 90-something percent of the people in the mediterranean were doing. jews are a visible minority. and then, everybody is doing lots of other things. >> one would have found a rich array of deities meeting the various needs of individuals. it's like going to a supermarket and being able to sort of shop for god. and you have them at various times in your life and for various functions of your... of your living. >> narrator: by the time paul arrived in corinth, pilgrims had been worshipping for centuries at local shrines, like the sacred spring of the pierenne. to devout pagans like these, paul's message of a jewish messiah come to save all mankind, jew and gentile alike, must have seemed outlandish. >> and so, when we hear paul say, "i've determined t
is essential to any exploration be on the world's orbits. no one thinks the will repeat the apollo program going there by ourselves. what can our international partners do? we have not really provided a hope for our partners in current policy. >> have you feel about putting focus on the space station but keeping in your open to going to mars and not to be asking for great amounts of money that it is going to take to do that until we perfect our reach in our own space station. >> if one does not support the space station well anything else is meaningless. the aftermath of the columbia accident we had very serious conversation with our international partners as to whether or not they wanted to stop and call it a day. they were very clear that we have to continue with the space station. it was not practical to talk about other international cooperation if we fail to at the station. i think the number one issue, utilization of the space station is the near term issue. insuring access to the station with higher reliability is a top issue. one of the concerns is on the sustainability of the stat
. >> well, we thought our chances were 10 percent. >> apollo 13 commander thinking one out of 10 chances of surviving that. isn't that out of this world? >> and you know what else is stock picks from our shooting stars. none of them heroes, but they are all good friends. >> the space program, for america. liquiify national gas is huge . the company will do extraordinary well because of it cheniere. >> i agree with you about natural gas in general. but i rather have companies that are making money >> what is making money. >> i think boring is it better. >> hey, i built a crire on it. >> it is it a three percent dividend yield as walgreen is, it is a good idea. >> ben? >> super competive field. it is a
. [ inaudible ] for all mankind. godspeed to the crew of apollo 17. >> i'm convinced the space program will come back. the country needs to have something to look forward to. to look up, to be proud of. what can we do in 10,000 years? my grandmother on a farm in michigan had a ring telephone, no electricity, an outhouse and she watched the first guy walk on the moon. >> i would like to see the next generation leave footprints like we have on the moon. i hope that happens. >> wow, a shining example of inspiration and american greatness. that program tonight, 9:00 p.m., fox news special, fly me to the moon, astronauts heading space. the never heard before stories tonight right here. you can hear from one of the mission members here in just a bit. astronaut rusty shahwihearth. >> don't miss the special. >> a shocking nfl tragedy leaves one player dead and defensive line lineman josh brent faces charges. how did it happen? what does the dallas cowboys front office say about the players? >> the flu is on the way. health officials warning of a looming crisis. why they say we could see the worst outbre
and god willing as we should return. for all mankind. god speed to apollo 17. ♪ >> i'm convinced the space program will come back. the country needs to have something to look forward to, to look up to, to be proud of. what could we do, look how far we went in 70 years. my grandmother, had no electricity, an outhouse and she watched the first guy walk on the moon. >> i would like to see the next generation footprints on the moon. i hope that happens. >> heather: you can catch that entire documentary fox news reporting "fly me to the moon." it airs right here 9:00 p.m. eastern. >> an update on venezuelan president hugo chavez. why he is heading back to the hospital. >> heather: plus right to work legislation setting off a firestorm in michigan. now thousands of union members are gearing up for a second round of protests at the state capital. how will this battle end of. you know how painful heartburn can be. for fast, long lasting relief, use doctor recommended gaviscon®. only gaviscon® forms a protective barrier that helps block stomach acid from splashing up- relieving the pain
seven game road trip for the first time since... it was 1970 when apollo 13 had a successful failure. richard nixon was in the white house and gas was 36 cents a gallon. yes, warriors are making history. >>> football coach mike macintyre is the new football coach. colorado hired macintyre to be their new man. he takes over a program that won just four games in their first two years. mike macintyre coached the spartans to their first ten-win season since 1987. >> i'm gonna do whatever colorado wants me to do. i got a lot of work to do. my heart is at the bowl game, but my mind and body is here working. >>> 49ers suspended running back jacobs for the rest of the season. jacobs is frustrated, saying that this is, quote, the worst year i ever had. he's played in only two games this year. >>> back to mike macintyre. he says he can recruit. and he kicks off the top five. >> let my beautiful wife stand up, my wife, trisha. from looking at her, you can definitely tell i can recruit. okay? >>> the pats routed the 11-1 houston texans. pats win 42-14. >>> former nba all-star mcgrady. and no. 2,
there is a seven and 1 million chance they could have come down on one of the apollo landings. they said the spacecraft on a more direct course towards the lunar surface. the point of collision, a nun named mountain near the moon's north pole. traveling at 6000 kph, it will be destroyed on impact. the area will be in shadow meaning there will be no images of the crash. it will send an unprecedented it will send an unprecedented amount
as an institution at the agency. he received numerous awards for his work on the apollo program, skylab, and the space shuttle, and he even served as an adviser for the "star trek" films. >> finally, it is that time of year in germany when the city streets start getting very loud at night. >> extremely loud. fireworks have gone on sale across the country, which means long lines immediately formed in front of fireworks factories where consumers can get better prices than they can in regular retail outlets. last year, germans shot of some 110 million euros worth of rockets, fire kravitz, and other pyrotechnics to ring in the new year -- of rockets, firecrackers and other pyrotechnics. >> it has started already in the street just outside deutsche welle. i heard the banks just before we came on -- i heard the bangs. >> and you will hear a lot more. thanks so much for your company. >> stay with us. we will have more news for you in 30 minutes time. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--
and also recovered the apollo ast astronauts before being retired in 1970. but other historic ships around the country, the yorktown is in need of costly repairs. >> the wear and tear from the salt water. >> reporter: rasing repair money for these privately run museum ships is a huge challenge. >> when you're looking at tens of millions of dolla that it will take to restore the uss yorktown, you can't sell enough t-shirts to make that happen. >> reporter: already a dozen historic ships have been lost. this ship, a cold war era submarine now in danger of toppling over. repairing it will cost more than $3 million. so chances are unless there's a big donation, it will be sunk at sea, closing another chapter in u.s. history. >> if they did away with all the museums, it would be like getting rid of the battle field, whether, you know, like gt gettiesberg, vix vicksburg. >> and other ships face the ravages of time. mark potter, nbc news, charleston. >>> that's nbc nightly news on this sunday. brian williams will be up tomorrow. i'm lester holt reporting from los angeles for all of us at nbc news
think people are ready for that. >> looking back at that flight, apollo 17, you were also on the moon longer than any human being in history, saying nothing of being the last. >> houston, the challenger has landed. >> roger, that's super. >> the first thing i remember is looking out at this mountainous valley and realize that i am now where no human being has ever been before. what i am seeing with my eyes had never been seen by human being in the history of mankind. at least that we know. i think one of the most rewarding thing is to share my experience and feelings with other people and try to answer some questions. i've been asked a million times, how does it feel to make that first step on the moon? neil, the first steps had already been taken before i got there, not just by neil but by everyone else who had been there before me. >> i would like to dedicate the first step of apollo 17 to all those who made it possible. >> last man to walk the moon. you look up at the moon. your kids look up, your grandkids look up at the moon. you were the last human being to touch that surface. h
have done worse? only one over three months and the nasdaq has done worse than apple. apollo. put up other names. we have very sign down 24%. you have this year's holdings down 23%. really only one stock. apollo. how you play apple at this point? >> to bring a but very good point. i love to take the lead of my colleague and friend with respect to price targets. the best play is a law were replay for a gradual rise up in the shares. 600. it returned to comment. a strategy that we have designed for this. you did downside protection down to about 460. it's a strategy where won't kid caught in the lingo, but you are essentially having a flat return for 10%. exposure to the shares below. make a more of a market return on the way up. liz: tell me about the order flow. >> they are resisting. which is interesting. because typically when we see this type of a decline we would want to make it as an opportunity, but most people are not willing to stick their toes in at this point. liz: let's put it in perspective . 6,900 percent over the past ten years. there is no -- >> the largest listed comp
to the teams of engineers, and scientists at nasa when speaking about the success of the apollo 11 mission he refused to take personal credit for his accomplishments. after leaving nasa, he soon found himself as nasa's high speed flight station located at edwards which would in time become the dryden flight research center. he spent seven years there, flying a variety of new design aircraft including seven flights at the control of the x-15. sneel a good friend and he's sorely missed by me and by all the people who touched in his long and active life. he's survived by his wife, carol, two sons, a stepdaughter, a stepson, and 10 grandchildren. this bill also names the western err nautical test range as the -- after hugh l. dryden. he held the post -- he was deputy director of nasa until his death in 1965. he did research into the speed of sound. his work contributed to the design of wings for aircraft including the p-51 mustang and other world war ii aircraft. before i close, i want to tell something that was interesting. president clinton, i think it was on the 25th anniversary, invited neil
think it is particularly important for youngsters. five years after the apollo moon landing, america was first in awarding engineering, math, science doctorates. first in the world. now we are 37th. where is the demand? there is nothing exciting going non-. our kids seem to get excited because there is a new iphone out. rather than we are going to the moon. i would like to talk a little bit about managers managing research companies. and manager, unless he himself is the creator, the technical mind, he overdoes -- excuse me, he does the wrong job. he should be out setting a goal only. he should also spend time raising the money peeping but he should not run the program. and this little quotation by a brilliant man -- if you want to build a ship, don't drum up people to collect would -- wood. well, it is you, the manager, who has selected the materials to make the product. if you give them tasks to do, then he has decided the manufacturing method. he thinks it is his responsibility as a manager because he is running the program, but what he will do is he will make a decision so that i
person to do that. he is the commander of a apollo 17 and the last ever made on the moon's surface leaving a special legacy for america's space program. joining us live. captain eugene cernan and last man to walk on the moon. i can't tell you how excited i was to talk to you today. thank you for joining us. >> you are welcome heather. you might have guessed i had no requests for auditions. >> heather: did you plan ahead what you were going sing and what you were going to do? >> no, we didn't. we plan ahead all we're going to from a scientific, but everything else you heard from most of these missions, your reaction to the environment and reaction to things. even things that were said when we left the moon, they come to you because of what you are confronted with. >> heather: explain to us. take us all back there that moment when you first stepped foot on the to the moon surface. what did you see and what did it feel like? >> well, heather, my first step was mine. no matter what a lot of people want to believe, it can never be taken away from me. the fact of life there were other pe
, it's been 40 years since apollo 17 made the last manned voyage to the moon. and now a private company from colorado is planning return trips. the golden spike company announced thursday plans to fly private clients to the moon. golden spike is led by a team of veteran nasa executives and rocket engineers. their expedition takes two people to the moon at a time. and the price tag, as you can imagine, isn't cheap. for two people, the cost is going to be $1.5 billion that would be $750 million per person, if you're interested. included in the package is 36 hours of lunar surface time, two spacewalks, equipment, and training all included. unlike the apollo missions to the moon, the lunar lander will be launched before the crew. and here is how it's all going to come down. first the lunar lander is launched and sent to the moon. the lander automatically orbits the moon and waits there. then the crew vehicle is launched. the crew is sent to the moon where they meet up with the lunar lander. the crew then enters the lander and prepares to land on the moon. after 36 hours of moon time, the la
back. david apollo is on loan from italy, it's in d.c. now, and to find out why david apollo is totally into politics, you have to check out my must read, it's on my facebook page, at facebook.com/janico. [ phillips' lady ] live the regular life. phillips'. woman: what do you mean, homeowners insurance doesn't cover floods? [ heart rate increases ] man: a few inches of water caused all this? [ heart rate increases ] woman #2: but i don't even live near the water. what you don't know about flood insurance may shock you -- including the fact that a preferred risk policy starts as low as $129 a year. for an agent, call the number that appears on your screen. it's so great to see you. you, too! oh, cloudy glasses. you didn't have to come over! actually, honey, i think i did... oh? you did? whoa, ladies, easy. hi. cascade kitchen counselor. we can help avoid this with cascade complete pacs. see, over time, cascade complete pacs fight film buildup two times better than finish quantum. to help leave glasses sparkling shiny! too bad it doesn't work on windows. okay, i'm outta here. cascade. the
. god's speed to apollo 17. >> tomorrow night don't miss fox news report fly me to the moon hosted by neil cavuto. >>> tonight a professional football player is dead another one charged with a shooting. the latest on fox top story when we come back. initiated. neural speeds increasing to 4g lte. brain upgrading to a quad-core processor. predictive intelligence with google now complete. introducing droid dna by htc. it's not an upgrade to your phone. it's an upgrade to yourself. >> tonight marks the first night of hanukkah. the story of hanukkah dates back thousands of girls when a small group known as the maccabees fought a war and won. when they returned to jerusalem there was only enough oil to burn the temple lamp for one night. by some miracle it burned for 8 years. the
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 110 (some duplicates have been removed)